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  • #31
    Originally posted by TriBel View Post
    Good call on Sharp Objects HowimetdaSlayer! Here's The Guardian review:



    You like it; Priceless likes it and The Guardian likes it. I feel a purchase coming on.
    Definitely a must own item!
    Originally posted by Priceless View Post
    Just watched the last two episodes. Gothic is definitely the word. Crazee
    Amen sister!

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by betta View Post
      Wow. I've just finished watching the last episode. I didn't see that coming!
      Ha ha, I figured out who the killer was after the first episode. As you can see in my post here: https://disq.us/url?url=https%3A%2F%...us&cuid=247272
      And the hints just kept piling up throughout the show. I was convinced it had to be
      Spoiler:
      Amma, with the little help of her friends
      and was just waiting for the reveal.
      But that didn't bother me - I always saw this more as a drama than a murder mystery. The characterization, acting, atmosphere, style, darkness, messed up family dynamics... everything was so well done.

      Originally posted by Priceless View Post
      I hope it isn't just Adora. I want to know who Camile's father is.
      1) Adora was 'married into the Preakers' - Camille's last name is Preaker, and 2) she was very young when she had Camille.

      So, my impression based on this info is: Adora was married to Camille's father - but she was very young. A child bride, just like the woman in the Calhoun day re-enactment?
      She clearly wasn't happy, and calls her (probably quite older?) husband "cold".

      She is probably a widow, as I imagine if she were divorced, there would be a lot of gossip about it in town. They're very old-fashioned. And there's no mention of the Preaker dude - Camille's father - being around. He probably died a long time ago, and Camille never got to know him, and her mother doesn't want to talk about him. Another sign she wasn't happy (no surprise, if she was a child bride).

      And since Camille's father is a non-entity, Camille's issues have nothing to do with him (Adora's, however, do). As far as the source of Camille's and Amma's issues, it's mostly Adora, and Alan as an enabler, and Wind Gap as a whole.
      You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

      Comment


      • #33
        She is probably a widow, as I imagine if she were divorced, there would be a lot of gossip about it in town. They're very old-fashioned. And there's no mention of the Preaker dude - Camille's father - being around. He probably died a long time ago, and Camille never got to know him, and her mother doesn't want to talk about him. Another sign she wasn't happy (no surprise, if she was a child bride).

        Spoiler:
        I think Adora probably killed him, with the same 'kindness' she showed her daughters


        And since Camille's father is a non-entity, Camille's issues have nothing to do with him (Adora's, however, do). As far as the source of Camille's and Amma's issues, it's mostly Adora, and Alan as an enabler, and Wind Gap as a whole.
        I think the lack of a father can give a child as many issues as a bad father/good father can, depending on the child and many other factors at play within and around the child's life
        Spoiler:
        Adora's mother seems to have also been 'ill', so I'm not sure I blame Adora or Amma, perhaps it was their genetic makeup. I don't think either woman could help what they became, I think it was possibly the case of the 'psychopathic' gene at play, aided by the fact that neither mother or child could break away from Wind Gap and find a 'better' release for their narcissistic tendencies


        But it was a good show, the performances were great. Special mention for the musical choices, which were fabulous throughout.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Priceless View Post
          Spoiler:
          I think Adora probably killed him, with the same 'kindness' she showed her daughters




          I think the lack of a father can give a child as many issues as a bad father/good father can, depending on the child and many other factors at play within and around the child's life
          Spoiler:
          Adora's mother seems to have also been 'ill', so I'm not sure I blame Adora or Amma, perhaps it was their genetic makeup. I don't think either woman could help what they became, I think it was possibly the case of the 'psychopathic' gene at play, aided by the fact that neither mother or child could break away from Wind Gap and find a 'better' release for their narcissistic tendencies


          But it was a good show, the performances were great. Special mention for the musical choices, which were fabulous throughout.
          Oh, the lack of father definitely does affect a child. I just meant he couldn't have done anything personally to affect her.

          I don't think any of these problems are genetic. They are clearly the result nurture, nor nature - of poor parenting and messed up family dynamics, plus the community of Wind Gap as a whole. Adora's mother was also abusive and messed her up.
          You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

          Comment


          • #35
            I don't think any of these problems are genetic. They are clearly the result nurture, nor nature - of poor parenting and messed up family dynamics, plus the community of Wind Gap as a whole. Adora's mother was also abusive and messed her up.
            I'm just not so certain. I think it's ambiguous. I prefer to think there was a genetic component involved. I think that's what that play was about - linking these women to the past generations, to the madness back then, that came through the generations. Camille didn't hurt others because she found a release in hurting herself, but that component was still within her. Just my reading of it.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Priceless View Post
              I'm just not so certain. I think it's ambiguous. I prefer to think there was a genetic component involved. I think that's what that play was about - linking these women to the past generations, to the madness back then, that came through the generations. Camille didn't hurt others because she found a release in hurting herself, but that component was still within her. Just my reading of it.
              That wasn't about how there's something genetically wrong with them. It was about how messed up the entire town of Wind Gap is, with their narrow-minded and oppressive and prejudiced views, their effed up view of their past and tradition and the role of women (and men).
              Why else did you think there was so much focus on the community and the mentality of the town? They aren't all related.

              It's not all about how "you are born evil/wrong" (which would be a stupid and horrible message to send, I thought we left that back in the 19th century with Lombroso and whoever and their theories of people being genetically evil).
              You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by TimeTravellingBunny View Post
                That wasn't about how there's something genetically wrong with them. It was about how messed up the entire town of Wind Gap is, with their narrow-minded and oppressive and prejudiced views, their effed up view of their past and tradition and the role of women (and men).
                Why else did you think there was so much focus on the community and the mentality of the town? They aren't all related.

                It's not all about how "you are born evil/wrong" (which would be a stupid and horrible message to send, I thought we left that back in the 19th century with Lombroso and whoever and their theories of people being genetically evil).
                You are right, but I also think having Amma as the lead actress was asking the audience to think further/deeper about the message. The town is messed up, no doubt, but I also think that there was a deeper message about this one family.

                Of course there is a genetic component to mental illness! Depression runs in families. Alcoholism and addiciton issues run in families.
                Spoiler:
                I don't believe in 'evil' as such- Adora was suffering from a mental illness called Munchausens by Proxy - it's an illness! Just as the need to cut yourself is an illness. Mental illness was present in this family for generations in my opinion, and that has nothing to do with 'evil'

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Priceless View Post
                  You are right, but I also think having Amma as the lead actress was asking the audience to think further/deeper about the message. The town is messed up, no doubt, but I also think that there was a deeper message about this one family.

                  Of course there is a genetic component to mental illness! Depression runs in families. Alcoholism and addiciton issues run in families.
                  Spoiler:
                  I don't believe in 'evil' as such- Adora was suffering from a mental illness called Munchausens by Proxy - it's an illness! Just as the need to cut yourself is an illness. Mental illness was present in this family for generations in my opinion, and that has nothing to do with 'evil'
                  Spoiler:
                  Killing girls does. People don't kill because they were born that way. Amma became the way she is and did what she did because of her she was treated by her mother, while her father enabled that behaviour, plus her entire upbringing in the larger community. Adora was probably the same, with her abusive mother Joya. Camille self-harms because of what her family - primarily her mother - and the Wind Gap community did to her.

                  Explaining everything, including crime, by genetics isn't looking deeper, it's the shallowest possible reading. It both absolves individuals of any responsibility for their actions, and absolves the community; brings a bunch of harmful messages - like the 19th centre idea that some people are born with a propensiry for criime - and a fatalistic view that people can't change anything about themselves or decide their fate, and fails to say anything interesting about the world.
                  You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by TimeTravellingBunny View Post
                    Spoiler:
                    Killing girls does. People don't kill because they were born that way. Amma became the way she is and did what she did because of her she was treated by her mother, while her father enabled that behaviour, plus her entire upbringing in the larger community. Adora was probably the same, with her abusive mother Joya. Camille self-harms because of what her family - primarily her mother - and the Wind Gap community did to her.

                    Explaining everything, including crime, by genetics isn't looking deeper, it's the shallowest possible reading. It both absolves individuals of any responsibility for their actions, and absolves the community; brings a bunch of harmful messages - like the 19th centre idea that some people are born with a propensiry for criime - and a fatalistic view that people can't change anything about themselves or decide their fate, and fails to say anything interesting about the world.
                    I don't think I said that all crime is caused by genetics. I think I was very specific,
                    Spoiler:
                    Munchausens By Proxy is a mental illness. That is the disease Adora was said to have been suffering from. I believe there is a genetic component to mental illness. For me, I believe this family had a genetic leaning towards mental illness. The town of course played a part, because these women weren't allowed to get the help they needed because they lived in rural redneck Missouri


                    I also think that a lot of anti-social behaviour, including criminal behaviour is caused by head injuries and brain trauma. I believe a lot of anti-social behaviour, including criminal behaviour is caused by chaotic upbringing, by how you are treated as a child, by numerous other things. . . But in this instance, from what I took from those 8 episodes, there is a genetic component to the behaviour of these women.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Some of the articles that sum up the show pretty well IMO:

                      https://www.spin.com/2018/08/sharp-o...se-adora-amma/

                      https://www.theatlantic.com/entertai...ew-hbo/568027/

                      https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b07295151513cb
                      You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Funny . . .

                        Comment


                        • #42


                          That's so wrong it's right.
                          You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            That was awesome!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Show to be released on dvd & blu-ray this Tuesday 11/27!

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