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Which Is Better, Season 6 or 7?

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  • Willow from Buffy
    replied
    Originally posted by TriBel View Post
    The simple truth being there is no truth? Or the simple truth being there's no truth - only truths in the plural?
    That truth is singular and easily uncovered. S6 has an unstable ontology. S7 reestablishes a stable one.

    Season 6 asks: Who is Buffy? Is she good or bad? Is she weak or strong?
    Season 7 answers: She's a hero. She's a hell-of-a-woman.

    Season 6 asks: What is real?
    Season 7 answers: Everything real. It is always real.

    Season 6 asks: Is reality subjective?
    Season 7 answers: No! Stop telling stories. Life is not a story.

    Season 6 asks: Is there any salvation? A way to improve the world? A way to find meaning?
    Season 7 answers: Yes. By breaking down the old prisons, we can find truth, community and freedom.

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  • TriBel
    replied
    And all of a sudden...."Tell anyone we had this conversation, I'll bite you"...takes on a whole new meaning!

    Hardly There's combination is crying out for Artisan Sourdough Bread!

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  • GoSpuffy
    replied
    Nothing beats peanut butter and honey but peanut butter and jam is also very good.

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  • HardlyThere
    replied
    Real peanut butter should only be combined with berries and berry preserves. None of this jam/jelly business.

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  • Double Dutchess
    replied
    Same here -- peanut butter is not combined with jam or anything else. Just pure, unadulterated peanut butter. In fact, peanut butter and jam sounds pretty gross to me. On the other hand, peanut butter and marmite is a combination I'd be happy to try.

    For me, S6 would be the marmite in the equation and S7 the peanut butter. For the record, I voted S6.

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  • flow
    replied
    Well, peanut butter is not ubiquitous here in Germany but it’s available and we do eat it from time to time. But most certainly not with jelly. Nor with jam. That would be an unimaginable blasphemy. It’s unthinkable. It’s like the moon and the earth. They can both exist at the same point in time but they should never collide.

    flow

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  • Stoney
    replied
    Jam is jam. Seedless jam is, well, just called seedless jam.

    Marmite is lurrrvely. I don't like it thick though, but on toast or in a marmite/peanut butter sandwich, yum!

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  • GoSpuffy
    replied
    It's called jam if the seeds are left in and jelly if the seeds are strained out in my world.

    And marmite.......ewwwww

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  • Stoney
    replied
    Although it's hard to watch I love Seeing Red, it is one of my favourite eps of the season and I definitely wouldn't change it. That it is a key point of contention is no surprise of course. I'm really looking forward to the conclusion of the review on the rewatch.

    Originally posted by flow View Post
    Peanut butter and jelly?
    Do you not have peanut butter flow? Or is it the combination with jelly you're querying (what we'd call jam)?

    Personally I think peanut butter with raspberry jam is passable but it is better on its own. I'm quite partial to it with marmite on occasions, but you can't beat a bit of crunchy straight on buttery toast.

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  • TriBel
    replied
    Originally posted by flow View Post
    Peanut butter and jelly?

    flow
    Almost..."It's an onion... and it's a flower. I—I don't understand how such a thing is possible".

    Sigh...reckon they could have replaced SR with a meal at a Thai restaurant.
    Last edited by TriBel; 27-06-19, 05:15 PM.

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  • flow
    replied
    Peanut butter and jelly?

    flow

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  • TriBel
    replied
    Williow from Buffy

    My theory is that the sexual assault and getting shot saves Buffy, which sounds awful, but hear me out... Buffy is reminded that she is flesh and that her body is her and that it is sacred and precious. The experience jolts her back into herself.
    Completely agree. Not only does it connect her to herself, it also reconnects her with the mother - Joyce is The Body. S7, I think, is an attempt to reconcile body and soul - to embody the soul (hence Spike feels his at the end). It's a movement away from the soul/body, spirit/matter dichotomy - the ontological dualism of Cartesianism - which, as I understand it, abjects the mother and the body. For me, this is why it's a feminist text.

    I hate SR and I wish they could have done it another way but I don't know that they could.

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  • SpuffyGlitz
    replied
    Completely agree about "beginnings" and "logos". I'm kind of resisting the urge to talk too much about BY because I've already written a portion of the review lol. But it's a great discussion!

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  • TriBel
    replied
    Originally posted by SpuffyGlitz
    TriBel, good point, I meant "bookends" in the sense that they bookend the seasons, not the "story" (which I don't necessarily see as linear either.)
    Which is why I agreed and disagreed with you. I'm in a bit of a quandary with the idea of "beginnings" - particularly with the idea of "the word" Is it meant in the biblical sense (In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God)? In the sense that word can also mean logos and logos is the principle of order and knowledge? But logos also refers us to Jesus Christ as the incarnate Logos - which kinda makes sense in relation to Beneath You (Spike's ramblings about flesh, the cross etc.). Is it referring to the time before language (so "word" in the axiomatic sense. Which kinda ties into the Scythe)? Does it refer to being without language as a species (neither the bringers or the Turok-Han have language) - or as an individual - the pre-Oedipal infant? Is the big bang the universe's primal event or the individual's?

    It's the same with the abyss at the end. What falls into it the void left by the removal of Sunnydale's deep structures is something ("home, sweet, home") that was there in the first place. I think Spike comments on it in A Dark Place.

    Basically, I'm not arguing with anyone - just highlighting paradoxes!

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  • SpuffyGlitz
    replied
    Originally posted by TriBel View Post
    It's why I agree and disagree with SpuffyGlitz "book-ends" metaphor (because it's linear). If she can get Escher to design the bookshelf, I'd be more inclined to agree (and I'm sure there are Escher steps in S8).
    TriBel, good point! To clarify, I didn't mean it as a metaphor, I meant very literally "bookends" in the sense that they bookend the seasons, not the "story" (which I don't necessarily see as linear either!) :-)

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