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BOOM! Buffy # 6 Issue Discussion Thread(Full Spoilers)

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  • #31
    Buffy hasn't felt like the protagonist of her own story since Issue #1. They usurped her role as the protagonist the moment it was revealed that it was actually Xander narrating the story. Since then, she's mostly felt like a background character in her own book.

    The ongoing problem is that they continue to expect us to have emotional investment in these characters because of the original show and *despite* the fact this is meant to be a reboot and the characters are very different. They've done almost nothing to earn emotional investment in these people or to buy into their relationships. This was evident yet again in those Giles/Jenny pages when Giles was speechifying about what a hero Buffy is and the faith he has in her etc. Wtf? They've barely even touched on their relationship and whenever they have Buffy seems totally uninterested and Giles seems concerned about her apathy. Where did that even come from? It's totally unjustified by the writing thus far and I can't even imagine what a brand new reader would be thinking if they weren't familiar with the original series. This would've been so much more interesting if we actually got to see their relationship develop in new and interesting ways. Instead they've just skipped ahead and expect us to believe it because they already know we'll imprint our opinions about the OG characters onto these Boomverse versions.
    "The earth is doomed!" - Banner by Nina

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    • #32
      Originally posted by vampmogs View Post
      Buffy hasn't felt like the protagonist of her own story since Issue #1. They usurped her role as the protagonist the moment it was revealed that it was actually Xander narrating the story. Since then, she's mostly felt like a background character in her own book.

      The ongoing problem is that they continue to expect us to have emotional investment in these characters because of the original show and *despite* the fact this is meant to be a reboot and the characters are very different. They've done almost nothing to earn emotional investment in these people or to buy into their relationships. This was evident yet again in those Giles/Jenny pages when Giles was speechifying about what a hero Buffy is and the faith he has in her etc. Wtf? They've barely even touched on their relationship and whenever they have Buffy seems totally uninterested and Giles seems concerned about her apathy. Where did that even come from? It's totally unjustified by the writing thus far and I can't even imagine what a brand new reader would be thinking if they weren't familiar with the original series. This would've been so much more interesting if we actually got to see their relationship develop in new and interesting ways. Instead they've just skipped ahead and expect us to believe it because they already know we'll imprint our opinions about the OG characters onto these Boomverse versions.
      I totally agree. And imo It is unearned. Reminds me of the nonsense we got in the Kirk/ Spock scenes in the rebooted Star Trek movies. The reasons why we felt the emotions in the original was because both characters had long on screen history, and in the movies they'd only just bloody met so why would they care If the other died?

      These Boom versions are shallow bland echoes of their on screen counterparts imo, and the comic writers have done nothing to alter my views on that.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by vampmogs View Post
        Buffy hasn't felt like the protagonist of her own story since Issue #1. They usurped her role as the protagonist the moment it was revealed that it was actually Xander narrating the story. Since then, she's mostly felt like a background character in her own book.

        The ongoing problem is that they continue to expect us to have emotional investment in these characters because of the original show and *despite* the fact this is meant to be a reboot and the characters are very different. They've done almost nothing to earn emotional investment in these people or to buy into their relationships. This was evident yet again in those Giles/Jenny pages when Giles was speechifying about what a hero Buffy is and the faith he has in her etc. Wtf? They've barely even touched on their relationship and whenever they have Buffy seems totally uninterested and Giles seems concerned about her apathy. Where did that even come from? It's totally unjustified by the writing thus far and I can't even imagine what a brand new reader would be thinking if they weren't familiar with the original series. This would've been so much more interesting if we actually got to see their relationship develop in new and interesting ways. Instead they've just skipped ahead and expect us to believe it because they already know we'll imprint our opinions about the OG characters onto these Boomverse versions.

        vampmogs

        you have articulated everything i have been
        thinking about this reboot—

        i'll doubtless keep reading for a while, if only
        to see what happens, but i have no substantive
        investment—emotional, intellectual—thus far:

        as you say, the text has not earned it...

        and i would add to this an echo of priceless'
        analysis of the writing: it simply is not very good...
        lacks that complex mix of emotion, humor, depth,
        linguistic play—those shattering, surprising, inutterably
        moving turns of phrase—that so marked the series...


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        • #34
          Instead they've just skipped ahead and expect us to believe it because they already know we'll imprint our opinions about the OG characters onto these Boomverse versions.
          And they're right, we will do that. The way I see it, the writer can ignore that fact and insist on writing the reboot like the original continuity doesn't exist for the sake of artistic purity (is that a word?) or, knowing that most of the audience is familiar with the source material anyway, she can skip the comic's equivalent of the slow first season and deliver a story that's exciting right from the very beginning. I think it's a fair trade-off.
          Last edited by a thing of evil; 07-07-19, 06:05 PM.

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          • #35
            a thing of evil: I don’t think this Buffy is boring, I just think I don’t connect with her. At all. It might be because her new personality that you have summed up very well just isn’t something I can relate to. I don’t think it’s a generational thing because original Buffy was not my generation either and I watched the show twenty years later. But it is, what it is. I don’t think it is my cup of tea. But I am still glad others enjoy it and are enthusiastic about it.

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            • #36
              It's finally arrived. I got the Giles cover. Once again Cordy does the intro. Is this going to be a continual thing? I love Cordy, but are we ever going to get an issue where Buffy gets the platform and speaks? Anyway, I do like these little intros, where we get an 'outsiders' perspective of what the heck is going on

              I like that mean-girl-Willow was actually done for a purpose and we're seeing that play out, with Willow blaming herself. I give Bellaire a lot of credit here, because I thought she'd just re-done Willow's character for no reason. I agree with everyone who says the purple on Willows face is to denote a split in personality, the mask that hides the real person.

              Enjoyed the Willow/Buffy dialogue, it does feel like there is a real friendship there. Especially enjoyed 'Don't talk to me like that. You hardly even know me' 'Ha! You hardly know yourself'. Hoping this is going to lead to more focus on Buffy and who she is, giving her more of a personality. So far it's very much as the snake demon says 'This wasn't about you', but her name is in the title, surely one issue has to be all about Buffy?

              I did not like the Giles/Jenny dialogue. When Jenny says 'she doesn't either', Giles's mind goes straight to Willow, and surely as the Watcher his first thought should be Buffy. I agree with everything Jenny says, as we've already seen from Buffy herself, it's the lack of control over her life that get's her down - the slaying, work, school, Eric, it feels like she had n choice in any of it.

              Giles doesn't accept this at all. 'She has never failed. She's immensely strong, intelligent and selfless . . . ' What a hell of a lot of pressure to put on a 16 year old. How's he going to react when she does fail? When she doesn't do the clever thing and is selfish? It's bound to happen, as no one is perfect and everyone fails at some point.

              I hate 'I look like a jerk now'. Giles is lecturing her at this point. His line 'being a great watcher requires . . . ' is also worrying. As Bellaire did with Willow, so I hope she does with the Giles and Buffy relationship, turns it around so Giles has to realise he's not a great Watcher and that Buffy isn't perfect and that sometimes she needs him to be more than what he is.

              Liked the 'foragists' banter, that's probably the funniest line so far.

              I liked the issue well enough. I'm just get bored with this Buffy. Should have made the title 'Willow & Xander: Friends of the Slayer' because everything of any interest has happened to them so far. I guess if I were 14 I might find Buffy running after Robin quite sweet, and maybe I should remember this comic is not aimed at me. I did like the twist at the end with The Council text.

              The art didn't bother me at all, it was fine. The story was good, though over too soon, I'd have liked to have seen their adventure take longer, it seemed too easy. Looking forward to seeing how losing part of her soul affects Willow, and restrains Xander.

              The letters in the Sunnydale Sentinel mention Darla, so I suspect we'll be seeing her at some point, though in what capacity, who knows
              Last edited by Priceless; 08-07-19, 10:41 AM.

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              • #37
                I don't usually dislike characters but I'm beginning to dislike Giles. As regards the comic in its entirety, I don't hate it but I'm kinda losing interest in it. If I put some effort in, I could engage intellectually but - TBH - I dunno if I can be arsed. It doesn't excite me enough.
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                • #38
                  Originally posted by TriBel View Post
                  I don't usually dislike characters but I'm beginning to dislike Giles. As regards the comic in its entirety, I don't hate it but I'm kinda losing interest in it. If I put some effort in, I could engage intellectually but - TBH - I dunno if I can be arsed. It doesn't excite me enough.
                  Completely understand that the comic doesn't excite you enough. This is not the tv show and it's not Whedon's comic either. I would like to know if he's had any input at all. It might sound like I'm not enjoying them, but I am interested in seeing what happens next, as the story and characters are interesting (except poor Buffy of course)

                  I do wonder if Bellaire has a trick in making characters arrogant only to have them humbled in some way, to learn a lesson. As Willow seems to have done. I am hoping that's what happens to Giles, because so far I'm not a fan. He confuses me. He says he is proud of Buffy because she has never failed, but then says he'll be there for her when she does fail, though he can't be her father figure. Either the writer is confused, or Giles is, or both. I'm hoping it's Giles and he has to figure out his role in Buffy's life has to be more than just a trainer, distanced from his charge.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Priceless View Post
                    Completely understand that the comic doesn't excite you enough. This is not the tv show and it's not Whedon's comic either. I would like to know if he's had any input at all. It might sound like I'm not enjoying them, but I am interested in seeing what happens next, as the story and characters are interesting (except poor Buffy of course)

                    I do wonder if Bellaire has a trick in making characters arrogant only to have them humbled in some way, to learn a lesson. As Willow seems to have done. I am hoping that's what happens to Giles, because so far I'm not a fan. He confuses me. He says he is proud of Buffy because she has never failed, but then says he'll be there for her when she does fail, though he can't be her father figure. Either the writer is confused, or Giles is, or both. I'm hoping it's Giles and he has to figure out his role in Buffy's life has to be more than just a trainer, distanced from his charge.
                    Initially, I was excited about the comic - particularly when we got the "realistic" art work. I'd clung to the idea that - with Whedon's input - it would address BtVS's "shortcomings". Not that I think it had many shortcomings but I wondered whether Buffy and the gang we had were still "fit for purpose" 20+ years after their inception (it sounds as though I'm being critical - I'm really not ). The same with any adaptation, I was interested to see what was taken away and what was added

                    Turns out, I'm fatigued by the whole thing. There's this - there's Angel - and unless I've misunderstood - a third strand? There's stuff coming out right, left and bloody centre to encourage speculation (and sales) and - not to put too fine a point on it - "It's doing my bloody head in!". I can't find anything to hang an argument, a thesis, on - I can't find anywhere to stand that'll give me a useful perspective.

                    The "pride comes before a fall" - I'm presuming that's the way she'll take it. I also think - to her credit - she's trying to write multifaceted characters. My problem at the moment is getting the fragments to cohere into some semblance of a whole.
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                    • #40
                      Wrapping Wednesday: Micro Reviews for the Week of 07/03/19

                      Spoiler:
                      “Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6” is a fun and humorous issue with a nice between action and plot development. This issue trades in Sunnyvale High School antics for a Dungeons and Dragons-like adventure. Immediately, writer Jordie Bellaire wastes no time throwing us into a fight with the first several pages. Who knew that giant beetles make for great comedic fodder?

                      Furthermore, the humor in “Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6” is enhanced by David Lopez’s art. While his art style is slowly growing on us after Dan Mora’s departure, Lopez’s art is expressive and has a strong sense of weight. Plus Lopez draws some spooky backgrounds such as a marsh-like place complete with spider webs. If anything, Lopez’s artwork is endearing as a whole as panels flow well moment to moment.

                      Of course, the art is not complete with Raul Angulo’s fun colors in “Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6”. Indeed, Angulo takes us from a dimly lit brown, yellow, and, orange room to the aforementioned green marsh. Angulo incorporates liberal use of violet in this issue such as goo that the giant beetles spew and Willow’s dress. Thankfully, the colors are not distracting as it works well with Lopez’s art.

                      The witty banter between Buffy and Willow is endearing and smartly written in “Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6”. If anything this issue shows how much of a family the Scoobie gang is. Despite arguing at one point, Willow and Buffy care one thing: saving Xander which is what motivates them. Speaking of Xander, he too provides some comic relief such as a Florida joke at one.

                      Overall, “Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6” is a fun and entertaining issue. Bellaire carefully balances humor with action. Lastly, the art continues to delight as Lopez finds his groove.

                      Final Verdict: 9.5– Laugh out loud jokes, insect slaying, and BFF antics make for a fun and entertaining adventure in this issue

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                      • #41
                        Jesus, sure he was reading the same comic as the rest of us?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Silver1 View Post
                          Jesus, sure he was reading the same comic as the rest of us?
                          I though the review was pretty spot on, though he's obviously an over marker. It was funny in places. The 'foragists' joke was the best the comic has produced yet. Buffy and Willow arguing is funny too. The art is not distracting and suited the story. He doesn't mention Giles, because he knows that's where it falls apart and needs more work.

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                          • #43
                            Other reviews (except for this one - the reviewer hates the art) are just as positive:

                            youdontreadcomics.com

                            Spoiler:
                            What are we willing to do for our friends? That’s a question that’s asked repeatedly in this week’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer #6. Jenny Calendar holds vigil to maintain the containment spell she’s cast on the maybe-but-not-quite-vampire Xander, all because of her bond with Giles. Willow sacrifices a piece of her soul to save Xander.

                            This issue makes the smart decision of teasing out the situation with Xander and whether he will become a vampire after the events of issue #4. Buffy and Willow manage to retrieve the mystical MacGuffin they need to save Xander’s soul, but not without revealing themselves to Robin Wood or getting into a bit of a magically manipulated spat.

                            Writer Jordie Bellaire has a superb handle on the personalities and dialogue of the main quartet of Buffy, Giles, Willow, and Xander, but she also has an opportunity to dig into supporting characters like Robin and Jenny Calendar. It’s clear that Bellaire has steeped herself in Buffy lore and characters, and is having fun reconfiguring and reimagining them in this new continuity.

                            David Lopez gets an opportunity to have some fun with the art this issue as well, with Buffy and Willow battling giant beetles and bargaining with a giant snake-woman statue thing. Colorist Raúl Angulo does excellent work creating a fantastical palette for these scenes, and contrasting them with the more realistic colors of the scenes in Giles’ apartment. Letterer Ed Dukeshire also gets to play a little bit with the word balloons of the snake statue.

                            As this issue plays with the themes of friendship and sacrifice, it also hints at upcoming drama as Robin Wood shows potentially nefarious ulterior motives. This is another solid issue of raising stakes and adding complications in a compelling new direction for the Buffy franchise; it’ll be interesting to see how it all pays off, if at all.


                            butwhythopodcast.com

                            Spoiler:
                            Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 is published by BOOM! Studios and written by Jordie Bellaire, with colors from Raúl Angulo, letters by Ed Dukeshire, and with David López. At the end of the last arc, a dejected Xander unknowingly walked into Drusilla’s trap, leaving him sired and his transformation into a vampire underway. Last issue saw the start of the new arc in the series where Willow, Buffy, Giles, and Jenny are focused on saving his soul.

                            Buffy The Vampire #6 starts in a jungle-esque area that looks about as different from Sunnydale as you can imagine. Reminiscent of a still from a Tomb Raider game, Buffy and Willow are in the middle of tracking down the soul tie, the only way to save their best friend. Fighting beetles and deciphering a map to find the next test, the two are doing everything they can to save Xander. Like the issues before it, we get to see Willow doing more than stand there clutching a spike or lightly hitting a baddy as we did in the television series. Instead, we see her in the middle of it, fighting with Buffy, even if she needs to be saved.

                            While the focus of the issue seems to be the quest, it quickly turns to focus on character relationships. The first of these is Willow and Xander. While it is brief, Will is devastated for not calling Xander. For inviting Robin to the movies. For not noticing that he wasn’t well and acting to help him. Truthfully, Bellaire’s words are Will to a tee. Including the great lengths that she goes through to help bring the soul tie back to save him.

                            One of the other large focuses in Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 is the friendship and stress between Willow and Buffy. When an unexpected friend shows up, the two have to move to the side and have a conversation. The dialogue here was perfect in bringing out the humor the original series was known for. While the way the two girls butt heads it showcases some of the character flaws that they both see each other as having. While this exchange is there to show increasing stress fracturing two and testing them, it does a lot to show them as more than just one dimensional best friends. They are real friends who disagree and hold onto baggage when things are going wrong but who will ultimately be there for each other.

                            Out of the stressful exchange between the two, Buffy’s self-assurance is under fire. Her strength is also the thing that endangers those around her because doesn’t ask for help. This isn’t the only time in Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 that Buffy’s strength comes up. As Giles and Jenny sit watch over Xander, the latter of which is actively keeping up a protective spell around him, Buffy’s vulnerability comes into question. Specifically, Jenny scolds Giles for not protecting her, for not recognizing that she deserves to have her innocence protected.

                            The exchange is frustrating at first, as Giles states that hhe isn’t Buffy’s father. That’s the truth, he isn’t her father, he’s her Watcher. That being said, the character of Giles is one of the best father-figures that has existed in a television show. But as I continued reading, Bellaire showed us a great understanding of the character.

                            Giles isn’t there to hold her hand, he’s there to believe in her and guide her. He knows what she is capable of, not because of Slayer powers or strength, but because she will do what is right. In a heartwarming response to Jenny, Giles stresses that unlike her real father, he won’t leave her, and he will be there if she falls. It’s a touching bit of dialogue that finally put Giles and his bond with Buffy in the spotlight and if Bellaire continues writing him this way, he’ll be one of the best dads in all of comics too.

                            In addition to adding more to Buffy’s character through those around her, Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 also makes a great point to highlight that the rest of Scoobies are more powerful than Buffy believes. It took years for the show to explore this, to showcase the lengths that Willow and Xander would go to to help and to save the world. This issue sets the groundwork towards highlighting the strength in them all, not just Buffy.

                            While I have nothing negative to say about the story or Angulo’s colors, I am still attempting to adjust to the change in the artist. Lopez’s work isn’t bad, it just seems tonally different than the story – which is escalated by the vast difference in style between the main cover and the interior pages. While they are done by different artists, I feel like Dan Mora’s art, which was featured in issues one through four fits the new covers done by Marc Aspinall. Beyond that, even with explaining that that “jungle setting” is actually down a hole in the woods of Sunnydale, it’s a weird location with little explanation to help me buy into their map leading them there.

                            With all of that said, Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 is a solid issue with enough heart and character progression to build out the world further. I am truly in love with these characters, their relationships, and I’m ready for more.

                            Buffy The Vampire Slayer #6 is available wherever comics are sold.

                            Rating: 4.5/5


                            bleedingcool.com

                            Spoiler:
                            Jordie Bellaire is doing some incredible work with BOOM! Studios re-invention of Buffy The Vampire Slayer, and I couldn’t be happier to see the bold new directions with the franchise that he and illustrator David López are taking the book in.

                            It would be really, really hard to take on a project like Buffy without panicking, let alone taking on a re-boot that aims to take the venerable franchise into the present day. Let’s be perfectly honest: fans don’t take well to course-corrections with their precious, whatever their precious may be. They hates it, precious. They haaaaaates it.

                            So, here comes Bellaire, bringing a joyously reverent take on Buffy The Vampire Slayer that is, all at once, a complet tribute to the original, and yet breathes much-needed new life into the characters.

                            Buffy and Willow are on a quest to save Xander’s soul, since he’s been turned into a Vampire by Drusilla. Oh, yeah. Drusilla is the Master, right from the beginning. Not some cool-aid stained, waxy-faced Nosferatu cosplayer.

                            And why are they trying to save Xander? Well, it’s because they love their friend. Not because of some wild, desperate crush Willow has on him. Will is gay, kids. It’s something she already knows, and we don’t need some wild, fourth season revelation to bring this about. She has a girlfriend that she loves, and she wants to save Xander because that’s what friends do.

                            It’s so great. So fresh, and so real. The dialogue is right out of the series, too, with that fun, rapid-fire back and forth that made Buffy The Vampire Slayer such a joy to watch. Giles and Jenny Calendar are a blast to read, and Xander is a dork. Even vampire Xander is a dork. I love it.

                            It’s the absolute best comics adaptation of Buffy yet in comics.

                            David López throws an interesting angle into the book, too. His art style is pretty cartoonish, but it adds a really fun element to the story. The faces his characters make are both true to the actors that played the characters, but make them breath more contemporary air.

                            Buffy The Vampire Slayer is another big win for BOOM! Studios, and I can’t wait to see where they take their new Buffyverse comics in the future!

                            Oh, the Cordelia summaries at the beginning are such a treat. Reading what she thinks is going on is so very true to Buffy.


                            beyondthepanel.net

                            Spoiler:
                            The best thing about this new Buffy series is everything that you haven’t seen before. New monsters is great, but to truly shake things up is to challenge these characters with situations they have never been in. Even if you knew that Xander would never turn into a vampire permanently, that didn’t change the pain of seeing any one of these three going through this kind of suffering. As I said before, one does not simply turn into a vampire and turn back.

                            Like most issues, I appreciate the little summary of events from the previous issue that we get from Cordy. It reminds you that she is more than just your average popular girl, and it keeps your mind set on what the focus of the story is. That being the adventure which Buffy and Willow set upon to retrieve a Soul Tie. The only thing that could save someone like Xander in the state he is in. Where this took them was exciting because the nostalgia quickly set in when remembering what a team-up looks like with these two, minus the magic. With Buffy as the muscle and Willow as the brains, it was a solid combination despite this adventure being fairly to the point. Which I didn’t have a problem with. Anyone could want to see a full D&D experience, but it was important to create a sense of urgency in saving Xander. I also welcomed the third-party involvement that you couldn’t have seen coming.

                            What truly did make the experience worthwhile was the emotion poured into it. In the previous issue we got plenty of emotional fallout from the way they found Xander, but this was that time for them to challenge their fortitude in the face of the possibility that they could lose a friend. For all the distance between them and Xander, there was no better opportunity to address this and show that his friends cared about his well-being. This may have taken the form of blaming themselves, but any person would also do the same in that situation.

                            Things did get interesting back with Giles, Jenny, and Xander. On one hand there was a surprising heart to heart shared between Giles and Jenny. One thing that we never got to see enough of was the perspective of others who see this dynamic between Giles and Buffy. Would most agree with this considering her age? Where is the line drawn between kid and slayer? Their conversation tackled this topic perfectly while reinforcing the confidence Giles has in Buffy despite his tough love. On the other hand, there was Xander who shocked for the kind of insight he has been able to pick up from being bitten. You wouldn’t think this to be possible, and yet this is the kind of story where you expect the unexpected. Especially when this insight allows a better understanding of what Mistress Drusilla and Spike have in store for the Hellmouth.

                            It was the creativity in things new which made this issue standout in contrast to some of the previous issues. These were no ordinary woods that Buffy and Willow traveled through. Neither were the creatures they encountered, or the big one they confronted at the end to retrieve the Soul Tie. That big creature was nothing at all what you imagined when thinking of an item which could save a life. It looked like something that would attack anyone between all the glowing red eyes and devilish horns, which worked for keeping everyone on their toes about how the encounter would end. For the most part it was the setting which popped out to me. I enjoyed the dark woods looks, with the misty atmosphere, and green-ish overlay. The only issue I found was that there was some panels where the perspective didn’t quite work for some of the faces. They ended up looking a bit awkward. However, these were not the important scenes, so it was easy to overlook this when the scene which demanded us feeling the emotion from these characters stood out.

                            Credit where it is due that this creative team is willing to take Buffy and company to new places as well. Buffy the Vampire Slayer #6 proved that even at this stage these kids are willing to go above and beyond to save the lives of those closest to them. This issue was overall adventurous, engaging, and clever for the twists thrown in here and there.


                            comicbook.com

                            Spoiler:
                            BOOM! Studios’ reboot of Buffy the Vampire Slayer offers the opportunity to give some characters the chance to be better than they were. Robin Wood has been the prime example of that so far. He wasn’t so much a bad character as introduced too late in the series to receive the same level of development as the other cast. Jenny Calendar is another. Appearing in the show’s first two seasons, Calendar was more plot device than anything else. She was a motivation for others with little motivation of her own, culminating with her being “fridged” to make a male character sad. In one scene, Jordie Bellaire gives Calendar more texture than she ever received on television. She converses with Giles about his paternalistic role in Buffy’s life. Sure, Giles still comes out “winning” the argument, but it’s a more important and interesting conversation than they ever had on screen. It’s one piece and another great issue of Buffy that captures the spirit of old Buffy while still feeling fresh, new, and different. Oh, and Robin Wood? Turns out he may be more changed from the original version than fans knew... -- Jamie Lovett

                            Rating: 4 out of 5

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                            • #44
                              Once again I ask did they read the same comic as the rest of us?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Don't Willow and Buffy argue about whether the beetles are beetles or 'roaches? I presumed it was because the beetles/roaches are in fact "bugs" - a visual metaphor for thoughts, feelings etc. that are "bugging" them. Perhaps that's why we have the "clear the air discussion"?

                                On a different note - I've just inadvertently found this on "Soul Ties" (they're a thing. Why didn't I know they were a thing?) http://www.greatbiblestudy.com/soulties.php

                                OMG:

                                "What a soul tie is
                                The Bible speaks of what is today known as soul ties. In the Bible, it doesn't use the word soul tie, but it speaks of them when it talks about souls being knit together, becoming one flesh, etc. A soul tie can serve many functions, but in it's simplest form, it ties two souls together in the spiritual realm. Soul ties between married couples draw them together like magnets, while soul ties between fornicators can draw a beaten and abused woman to the man which in the natural realm she would hate and run from, but instead she runs to him even though he doesn't love her, and treats her like dirt. In the demonic world, unholy soul ties can serve as bridges between two people to pass demonic garbage through. I helped a young man not too long ago break free from downright awful visitations from demons, all due to an ungodly soul tie he had with a witch. The man was a Christian, and the only thing that allowed her to send demonic torment his way, is through the soul tie. Other soul ties can do things such as allow one person to manipulate and control another person, and the other person is unaware to what is going on or knows what is going on, but for no real reason, allows it to continue".

                                I refuse to take this seriously on the grounds of the misused apostrophe in its and the use of the word "fornicators".
                                Last edited by TriBel; 12-07-19, 01:05 PM.
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