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Challenge 82: Technical - Blending

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  • Priceless
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    Images by @btvsscreenshots Insta

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  • Double Dutchess
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    Originally posted by Stoney View Post
    I've just started this tutorial and I'm not sure that it is picture opacity that the adjustment is meant for, which could explain the difference in the boldness of the tutorial pics against your own. The tutorial says...
    "I choose two caps to start. And I place them on the canvas and apply layer masks, erasing away parts of them. I want to pause and say that erasing can be very subtle. I rarely erase with the Flow or Opacity set at 100%. In fact, I like to have the Flow (or Opacity should work just as well if you are using an older version of Photohsop) set somewhere between 18-30%. This way is erases part but not all of the images and it allows for the image to fade more naturally rather than just ending abruptly. The only trick to make sure that you keep softly erasing away the harder edges of the caps."

    I think she is referring to a brush setting. I didn't know what 'flow' was so I did a google search and it seems to be an alternate to affecting opacity and when it is used on a brush then it affects the control you have over increasing a build up on your brush strokes. I called up the brush panel (window > brush) and under 'transfer' there appears to be an opacity and a flow 'jitter' option. Increasing this seems to bring in gaps to the brush stroke that would soften the effect a bit and then the idea of needing to 'keep softly erasing away the harder edges of the caps' would make sense. It is a bit like putting a grey setting on your brush when erasing in the layer mask so that you are only softly reducing the picture away rather than getting hard edges. I think this is what is meant rather than reducing picture opacity.

    I'd really like to hear the opinion of those who are far more practiced and knowledgable in Photoshop, because I could be completely wrong.
    I think your interpretation makes most sense. Changing the opacity of the whole layer against a black background would make it very dark.

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  • Stoney
    replied
    I don't see any problem at all with keeping it open if people are still wanting to explore the technique. I'm not sure if I'll get the chance to do another as the school hols are about to start and I need to catch up with the rewatch, but you never know. It'll be great to see what others produce anyway.

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  • Priceless
    replied
    Originally posted by buffylover View Post
    Can we keep this thread open a little more because I would like to try again?

    You guys made me inspired to try another one!
    Definitely. I might attempt another one.

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  • buffylover
    replied
    Can we keep this thread open a little more because I would like to try again?

    You guys made me inspired to try another one!

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  • Stoney
    replied
    Corrupted



    Credit: brushes - daydreaming (click for full size image)


    This tutorial was actually pretty close to how I tend to create pieces, so it was interesting to see where the differences were. I haven't messed about with the flow/opacity jitter on brushes before, so I learned about that and I don't tend to put the shots on lighten against each other, so that was new too. I also probably tend to have more negative space than I let myself use here, as I was trying to place more pics as per the tutorial. I really appreciated learning a bit more about Photoshop. Sorry for posting late.
    Last edited by Stoney; 22-10-19, 08:05 PM.

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  • Priceless
    replied
    You're probably right Stoney. I just assumed that she meant the opacity of the picture, which does also help with blending. I'll try and have a look at how you reduce the opacity/flow of a brush

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  • Stoney
    replied
    Originally posted by Priceless View Post
    I felt my first attempt was too light, when compared to the tutorial, which seemed more shadowy. I was trying to get that shadowy feeling to it, which I think I achieved, but it made it hard to see. I reduced every cap to 30% opacity as suggested, and mainly just left it there.
    I've just started this tutorial and I'm not sure that it is picture opacity that the adjustment is meant for, which could explain the difference in the boldness of the tutorial pics against your own. The tutorial says...
    "I choose two caps to start. And I place them on the canvas and apply layer masks, erasing away parts of them. I want to pause and say that erasing can be very subtle. I rarely erase with the Flow or Opacity set at 100%. In fact, I like to have the Flow (or Opacity should work just as well if you are using an older version of Photohsop) set somewhere between 18-30%. This way is erases part but not all of the images and it allows for the image to fade more naturally rather than just ending abruptly. The only trick to make sure that you keep softly erasing away the harder edges of the caps."

    I think she is referring to a brush setting. I didn't know what 'flow' was so I did a google search and it seems to be an alternate to affecting opacity and when it is used on a brush then it affects the control you have over increasing a build up on your brush strokes. I called up the brush panel (window > brush) and under 'transfer' there appears to be an opacity and a flow 'jitter' option. Increasing this seems to bring in gaps to the brush stroke that would soften the effect a bit and then the idea of needing to 'keep softly erasing away the harder edges of the caps' would make sense. It is a bit like putting a grey setting on your brush when erasing in the layer mask so that you are only softly reducing the picture away rather than getting hard edges. I think this is what is meant rather than reducing picture opacity.

    I'd really like to hear the opinion of those who are far more practiced and knowledgable in Photoshop, because I could be completely wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    I can see what you mean about the shadowy aspect of the tutorial between the blends and I think you have captured that in your third more compared to the other two. The tutorial picture doesn't look dark in the same way to me though. Perhaps because it has heavier areas where the white, blue/green and light orange really come out of the shadowyness of the pics too. The pics seem more bold as well as having the shadows blending between them.

    I actually really like your first one the most. I think the use of the larger head shot in the blue (from BY?) is great against your selection of images to the right which really presents as him contemplating and looking back. But I do think you have got the breaks between the images blending smoother in the third.

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  • Priceless
    replied
    Pricey, your last piece seems really dark. I'm struggling to see some of the caps. I hope you don't mind, but I thought I'd ask in case you haven't tried adjusting to allow for it (it could always be my monitor settings of course). Have you tried putting adjustment layers over it? Using 'auto' adjustments to brightness, levels and curves can often help with contrast. Or duplicating all your layers and putting the duplicated batch as 'screen' on the layer effect (you'd normally adjusting the opacity to reduce the strength).
    Thank you for the feedback Stoney It is dark, and that was sort-of deliberate. I felt my first attempt was too light, when compared to the tutorial, which seemed more shadowy. I was trying to get that shadowy feeling to it, which I think I achieved, but it made it hard to see. I reduced every cap to 30% opacity as suggested, and mainly just left it there. I did 'auto' a lot of things, but I still wanted to keep that shadowy affect.

    When you look at the tutorial picture, do you think it's dark?

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  • Stoney
    replied
    Great pieces everyone and really varied which is always more interesting.

    Pricey, your last piece seems really dark. I'm struggling to see some of the caps. I hope you don't mind, but I thought I'd ask in case you haven't tried adjusting to allow for it (it could always be my monitor settings of course). Have you tried putting adjustment layers over it? Using 'auto' adjustments to brightness, levels and curves can often help with contrast. Or duplicating all your layers and putting the duplicated batch as 'screen' on the layer effect (you'd normally adjusting the opacity to reduce the strength).

    As usual I'm lagging. I have a bunch of AtS caps that I need to pick from now. I'm really frustrated that my own DVDs obviously have some screengrabbing block on them. I can't play them on my laptop and take caps so I have to go through uploaded versions online, which just seems ludicrous to me. Anyway, I will hopefully have something tomorrow but it might be the start of next week if I struggle to pick which caps work together (I ended up with waaaay too many for one piece. ).

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  • buffylover
    replied
    I'm glad that I at least tried this tutorial.

    I really did struggle, but I'm thrilled that I tried it. I do like them but for some reason, it felt that it wasn't who I am in fan art.

    I did LOTR! and I find that the screencaps were really hard to blend. There can't take high adjustment settings without pixelating.


    The mines.



    {here}

    Credits;
    Screencaps; {here}



    You shall not pass.




    {here}

    Credits;
    Screencaps; {here}


    Until next time,

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  • Priceless
    replied
    Another attempt. Think it's a little bit of an improvement . . .

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  • Stoney
    replied
    I've just been reminded by my calendar about this challenge so I thought I'd bump the thread in case anyone else had forgotten about it. I'll try to grab some time in the next week to pick something to try the tutorial with.

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  • Double Dutchess
    replied
    In my entry I combined techniques from both tutorials, using 'lighten' for the background layer with Giles and using the clouds brushes as erasers for most of the rest. I always use the eraser a lot, but mostly for making cut-outs using a hard edged basic brush. So using the eraser with the cloud brushes for blending was still a useful new technique for me to learn.



    Click here for the full-size (1920x1080) wallpaper

    PS: I hope the image didn't come out too dark. I'm not 100% sure I can trust my monitor.

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